Heroism in Today's World Something Greater than Yourself

Your Name: Mike Waters

School: El Dorado Adventist School
E-mail Address: mwaters@easchool.com
Published Date: April 13, 2012
Subject(s): English and History
Intended Grade Level(s): 8th Grade

Description: The instructor will use the resources in the T5 Friends Pathways Curriculum, focusing on the story of Eric Liddell. Students will understand the idea of service and sacrifice and how the power of competition and survival are connected to heroes and what it means to be a hero today in this world. Students will explore the various depictions of heroes and then determine what a hero means to them.

Pathways Theme, Goals, and Skills:
Target 1: Read to obtain information, writes from a Christian perspective.
Target 2: Writes with precision and clarity, explores themes and symbols within the biographical mainframe.
Target 3: Uses primary and secondary sources with efficiency.
Target 4: Will integrate technology and encourage critical thinking and problem solving using a number of technological resources.

Faith Integration: Exemplifying SDA standards, the student will understand how God can reach anyone at anytime, and allow them to do great things for God's glory. Students will learn how to face tragedies and obstacles, learn the power of service and witnessing, and see examples of strong personalities doing things for good instead of greed or personal fame.

Technology Standards:

  • Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge and develop innovative products and processes using technology.
  • Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
  • Design and develop digital projects and assessment tools for classroom use.
  • Use modern online tools to evaluate and use information resources to support research and learning.

Materials/Hardware/Software: List all materials, hardware, software needed for the learning centers. If specific online tools are used, list those as well.

Teacher Preparation:

Students should all have a copy of Something Greater than Good by Eric Liddell and Unbroken by Louis Zaperini.
Teacher should make sure all programs are running on the different work stations.
Teacher should make sure all applications and internet sites and links are working properly.
Teacher will remind students that the material should be read and teacher will already prior assess what the student understands from the initial reading of the text.

Student Preparation: Students need:
  • Instructions on internet safety and quiz on correct policy and etiquette for IPad or computer use in the classroom.
  • Instruction on syncing, saving to correct email folders, Instruction on specific application use.
  • Instruction on cloud management and format of electronic portfolio.

Classroom Management and Decoration:

Classroom will be organized in peer groups. Students will be put in appropriate study and discussion groups based on differentiated learning strategies. Students with lower reading skills will be joined with at least one student with a higher reading skill.

The classroom is organized where groups can come together in the center of the classroom where there is a larger workstation. If students need to work individually on a desk or a computer, they can go to the edges of the classroom where there are desks around the walls.

Students are always putting up their assignments on the walls and around the sides of the classroom to illustrate their work.


Differentiated Instruction:
  • Crosscurricular Activities - center 1, 3, 4. Students can explore interests in Science, Social studies and sports while still focusing on the English curriculum.
  • Group learning - center 1, 3, 5. Students can work in groups and use the strengths of their classmates in order to create a quality project.
  • Flexible Grouping - center 1, 5
  • Mixed ability and ESL integration - 4, 5. students can write parts of the movie in Spanish or another language. Students can write their letter in their language if they want.
  • Emphasize creative and critical thinking as a goal for design - center 2, 5.
  • Offer adjustable levels of difficulty - 1, 2. Students can rewrite their responses into a persuasive essay that argues which Olympics was more meaningful. Students can play with embedding video and text into their Keynotes. They can also put it on YouTube.


Center 1 - Olympic History Introduction. Venn Diagrams and Comparison Response

Compare and Contrast the 1924 and 1948 Olympics. Students will use the two websites of the 1924 Olympics and 1948 Olympics. Using the information, the students will work in groups of 2 to create Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting the activities, the social climate, the political differences and other notable events between the two events. Students will then write an individual comparison response that will reflect knowledge of the events and the cultural context that separates the two Olympiads.

Student Resources:
Copy of the Venn Diagram (Students can do their own)

Rubric For Comparison and Contrast Response


http://www.olympic.org/paris-1924-summer-olympics
http://www.olympic.org/london-1948-summer-olympics

Multiple Intelligences:
  • Verbal/Linguistic - Communication understanding partner and his/her topic
  • Visual/Spatial - Using Diagrams
  • Interpersonal - paired reading and paired discussion

Center 2 - Powerpoint Biography Focus

Students will work on their IPADS to create a 10 slide biography focus on either Eric Liddell or Louis Zamperini. Each student will use KeyNote and using their book for textual support create a biographical Keynote presentation using swipes, graphics, and animation in order to present the lives of one of these 2 extraordinary men.

Here is a link to KeyNote and how it works (a FAQ guide for students who may still be struggling with this online resource).
How to use Keynote
Criteria document for each slide.

Rubric for Keynote presentation:


Something Greater then Good - Eric Liddell Will link to the Ibook library where students will have the book on their device.
Unbroken - Laura Hillenbrand Will link to the Ibook library where students will have the book on their device.

Multiple Intelligences:
  • Visual/Spatial - Keynote: Using appropriate graphics and backgrounds


Center 3 - What is a Hero? Photojournalism project

Students will get into discussion groups and discuss the discussion prompt written below. After coming up with a number of discussion points, students will go on a "walkabout" with their IPADS. Using their IPADS, students will take pictures, interact with parents, other students and teacher, give interviews and ask questions related to this prompt. Students will then take these pictures and create a photojournalism page where they show visual evidence of what they have uncovered concerning their discussion topic.

TOPIC:
"Being a hero is not simply being a good role model or a popular sports figure. We believe it has become necessary to revisit the historical meanings of the word, and to make it come alive in modern terms. By concentrating more on this high watermark of human behavior, it is possible to foster what we term “heroic imagination,” or the development of a personal heroic ideal". - Philip Zimbardo. How can we see this illustrated on and around the El Dorado Adventist Campus, and how can we exercise this heroic ideal into something God asks us to be?
heroism in today's world Article from where the prompt comes from.

Materials needed - IPAD (comes with camera and video camera)
List of questions based upon discussion

Criteria for Photojournal


Multiple Intelligences:
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic - Active photography; looking for photo opportunities
  • Visual/Spatial - Analyzing and understanding art and photography

Center 4 - Be A Hero to Others
In this center, students will learn how they can be heroes to others less fortunate and be able to see how they can create change in today's world as well as be stewards for Christ. Students will use their IPADS and go to the Amnesty International website. Here they will find a person or a cause that they can associate with. With their prior knowledge on how to write persuasive letters and essays, the students will each write a letter to the organization or country where the person they choose may be having problems. They will then write a formal, polished persuasive letter asking for amnesty on behalf of the person they choose. Students will then share in class the problem they wrote about and explain to the class why their letter may be leverage to helping the person who needed help.

amnesty international - get involved website
Formal letter template (resource from businessletterformat.org)

Multiple Intelligences:
  • Verbal/Linguistic - communicating with others using writing
  • Interpersonal - discussion with students about sensitive issues

Center 5 - Watching Heroes at Work and Play

Lastly, for fun students will create short video on their their IPADS. Students will create a short 3-4 minute trailer on their IPADS for the Eric Liddell or Louis Zamperini movie that they wish was coming out. Student will take exciting events from the story and using the camera and their imaginations will film a trailer that teases the excitement of the book. Students will work in subgroups to A: write the script B: turn it into a storyboard C: work on the background and props D: Act in the trailer.

Students will be graded on completion of work, accuracy of trailer to events in the book, resourcefulness and creativity, and teamwork.


Rubric for grading trailers

Multiple Intelligences:
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic - Acting in Trailer; Building backdrops or moving props
  • Verbal/Linguistic - Writing scripts and storyboards
  • Visual/Spatial - Working with camera/angles and sound


Differentiated Instruction:
  • Crosscurricular Activities - center 1, 3, 4. Students can explore interests in Science, Social studies and sports while still focusing on the English curriculum.
  • Group learning - center 1, 3, 5. Students can work in groups and use the strengths of their classmates in order to create a quality project.
  • Flexible Grouping - center 1, 5
  • Mixed ability and ESL integration - 4, 5. students can write parts of the movie in Spanish or another language. Students can write their letter in their language if they want.
  • Emphasize creative and critical thinking as a goal for design - center 2, 5.
  • Offer adjustable levels of difficulty - 1, 2. Students can rewrite their responses into a persuasive essay that argues which Olympics was more meaningful. Students can play with embedding video and text into their Keynotes. They can also put it on YouTube.

Permissions:
This learning center and lesson plans, as well as all materials may be used in the classroom.